Posts in Category: Featured Artist Series

featured artist series : nellija zi

Felted Dioramas

We are in love with this beautiful work by Nellija Zi made special for Nineteen Ten Home’s Featured Artist Series.  Inspired by children’s literature, each diorama is carefully needle felted to capture the artist’s interpretation of a part of the story.

The work is for sale and on display until November 5th 2016.

From left to right:  “Succumb” inspired by The Giving Tree written by Shel Silverstein; “Adapting” inspired by The Rabbit Children written by Sibylle von Offers ; “Fitting In or Standing Out” inspired by Alice in Wonderland written by Lewis Carroll ; “Courage” inspired by East of the Sun, West of the Moon collected by Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe.

About the artist: Nellija Zi was born and raised in Latvia. Both of Nellija’s grandmothers were very adept in textile craftsmanship and were able to pass down their knowledge onto her as a young child. Nellie moved from Latvia to live in Norway at the age of 18 years old to study Communications. She rekindled her love for textile design after moving to Vancouver, where she now lives with her beautiful family.

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featured artist : lucy poskitt

Lucy-Poskitt

WHAT’S HAPPENING
New Weavings by Lucy Poskitt
May 14 – July 16

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Meet the Maker
Saturday June 18 1-5pm

After a few years of following Lucy Poskitt’s journey, we are incredibly honoured to host a new collection of her weavings as part of our Featured Artist Series.  Lucy is a fibre artist living and working in Vancouver. Her work walks the line between traditional image-based tapestry and textile-yardage weaving defining a style that is uniquely her own.

Join us on Saturday June 18th from 2-4 for an opportunity to meet Lucy, see her in action and learn more about her process and inspiration.
There will be snacks and refreshments to enjoy as well.

The work will be on display and available for sale at Nineteen Ten until July 16th, pricing is available upon request.

Please enjoy the below interview with Lucy, and be sure to follow her on
instagram! xo

CAN YOU INTRODUCE YOURSELF & DESCRIBE WHAT YOU DO ?
Hello! I’m Lucy Poskitt and I’m a textile artist. I work mostly with weaving at the moment but I’ve had my hand in all sorts of art forms over the years. I teach weaving as well, to groups and individuals.

HAVE YOU ALWAYS BEEN A MAKER ?
Always! I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t creating something – most of my memories from when I was little are of making, creating or dreaming something up.

HOW DID YOU GET TO WHERE YOU ARE NOW ?
My mom has a dear friend, Ingrid, who is a wonderful weaver. Growing up, whenever we visited her I would get a glimpse at her weaving studio and be totally mystified as to what went on in there – crazy contraptions and heaps of wool! Fast forward a decade and I’m at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University, slowly driving myself insane with a lot of printmaking. The printmaking studio, as much as I loved it, was a very intense and competitive atmosphere: cold, hard and literally grey. For me, the act of printmaking was often a lot of buildup leading to eventual disappointment, I rarely felt as though the image in my head was being accurately translated to the paper.
Because of Ingrid, I’d always wanted to take weaving as an elective at NSCAD but I didn’t really expect to love it as much as I did. The weaving studio was like the antidote to the printmaking studio: While still very process-based and rhythmic (something I loved about printmaking), the studio was warm and colourful, tactile and comforting. I loved it from the very first moment! After university I took a break from making art for a few years but eventually developed chronic insomnia (!) which only started to go away when I started weaving again, no joke! I think the brain needs something to plan for and anticipate and mull over in order to be able to shut down and sleep at the end of the day, and for me that ended up being weaving.

Moon weaving on the loom

New Weavings by Lucy Poskitt

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR AESTHETIC ?
I think I would describe it as confused! I think there’s power in minimalism, in a restrained hand in both art and design… but sometimes I really crave that cacophony of texture! and colour! and motion!  I often find myself making a very detailed and laborious series of works followed by a “quick and dirty” series of works. Or flat and minimal pieces followed by something that contains tons of texture. I would find it very hard to create only one style of work for the rest of my life, I can’t imagine limiting myself to that!

WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR INSPIRATION  ?
I’ve moved many many times and lived all over Canada… so much so that I think I’m perpetually homesick – always longing for a place that I can never put my finger on, and so I guess I’ve always been inspired by place: that elusive sense of home, the feelings and emotions that scenery can convey, the mystery of maps. I love that lonely feeling that a sparse landscape gives me and I see stories in groups of islands and far-away mountains, weather patterns, maps of places with no roads…

IF YOU WEREN’T A FIBRE ARTIST, WHAT WOULD YOU BE ?
Definitely a baker. In fact, I still want to be one!

WHAT DOES CRAFT MEAN TO YOU ?
Whoa, I could write an essay on this question…I hardly know where to start! Firstly there is no difference in my mind between Craft and Art (that old debate eh?), there is a difference between craft and kraft but that’s for another essay.
In short I think that craftsmanship, in its truest sense, is the noblest thing we can aspire to. To take a raw material and carefully, consciously turn it into something useable and/or treasured through hours of laborious process, is so honorably heartbreaking to me. Heartbreaking because not everyone appreciates the process! When you can find mass-made “handcrafted style” objects everywhere – from shibori and batik prints at Old Navy to weavings at Target to a myriad of other examples – it shows that people appreciate the look of crafted items, but are unwilling to accept that that type of work comes with a price to it because an actual human made it and wants to earn an actual living wage from it. (and hey, we’re all guilty of it!) When the mass-market appeal is gone does that mean that the small-market appeal will also dry up? I don’t want it to! Craftsmanship will always exist, and we will always have to contend with the faster-cheaper competition, we just have to trust in the people that know the difference.
*steps off soapbox*

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Weaving colour palette

 

 

WAS THERE A PARTICULAR INSPIRATION BEHIND THE COLOUR PALETTE IN THE NEW WORK ON DISPLAY AT NINETEEN TEN ?
Not particularly… It is a lot more colourful than my previous work but I attribute that more to the material than a conscious decision on my part: The weft I used for most of these pieces is a very special and hard-to find discontinued line of yarns made of silk and hemp fibres. I covet this yarn but it is soooo pricey so when it happened to go on sale at two different stores and I bought as much of it as I could afford and the colours just happened to go together, voila!

HOW LONG DID IT TAKE TO MAKE THIS RECENT COLLECTION  ?
Each piece takes upwards of 20-50 hours to complete, from start to finish.

IF YOU HAD TO CHOOSE AN ALL TIME FAVOURITE PIECE YOU’VE MADE, WHAT WOULD IT BE AND WHY ?
Oooh tough one. My current favourite is in this collection, actually: the Monsoon piece. I love it so much because it turned out exactly as I had imagined it would. I don’t tend to make very detailed sketches of my work, and I was working on this piece at a loom that only allows me to see about 6 inches of the underside piece at a time (never the front!). When I finally pulled it off the loom and turned it over there was a giant sigh of relief and a lot of heart-eyes and oohs and ahhs coming from me.